Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

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Tuly
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Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by Tuly »

Here is the well known story of this young man, known in the story as C. Allen Huntington. There are church history revisionists that are questioning Solomon F. Kimball's account, nevertheless I''m adopting this account. He was the son of Dimmick Huntington who was Oliver Boardman's elder brother. That makes him the cousin of George William so he is Dad's first cousin three times removed. I got this other info from ancestry.com
# Name: Clark Allen HUNTINGTON
# Given Name: Clark Allen
# Surname: Huntington
# Sex: M
# Birth: 6 Dec 1831 in Watertown, Jefferson, New York
# Death: 16 Nov 1896 in Kanab, Kane, Utah
# Burial: 17 Nov 1896 Kanab, Kane, Utah
# Ancestral File #: 1FKS-61
# LDS Baptism: 6 Dec 1839
# Endowment: 17 Mar 1854 Temple: EHOUS - Endowment House
# Change Date: 31 May 2003 at 00:00



Father: Dimmock Baker HUNTINGTON b: 20 May 1808 in Watertown, Jefferson, NY
Mother: Fannie Maria ALLEN b: 26 Oct 1810 in Watertown, Jefferson, NY
Helping the Martin Handcart Company across the Sweetwater River

On 28 July 1856 a handcart company under the leadership of Edward Martin left Iowa City, Iowa, and started across the plains to the Salt Lake Valley.

By October, cold weather and snow caught them in the mountains in central Wyoming. Short on food and other supplies, members of the company experienced exposure to cold, hunger, and exhaustion, and some began to die. They would suffer more losses than any other pioneer handcart company.

Earlier in October, when Brigham Young learned that there were still many Saints out on the trail, he sent a rescue party with supplies to help bring the people to Salt Lake. The Martin Company met up with rescue party members in late October and early November and received welcome but limited amounts of food and supplies. With the rescuers' help, they struggled on toward Salt Lake.

On 4 November they came to the Sweetwater River, near Devil's Gate. The river was about 100 feet wide and almost waist deep in places. To make it worse, big chunks of ice were floating in the water. For the weakened members of the Martin Company, the crossing appeared almost impossible.

One of the handcart pioneers later remembered that some of the pioneers were able to ford the river, but others could not. At that point, several members of the rescue party—one account names C. Allen Huntington, Stephen W. Taylor, and teenagers David P. Kimball and George W. Grant—stepped forward to help. These courageous men "waded the river, helping the handcarts through and carrying the women and children and some of the weaker of the men over" (John Jaques, "Some Reminiscences," Salt Lake Daily Herald, 15 Dec. 1878, 1; see also 19 Jan. 1879, 1).

One of the women who was carried over the river later recalled: "Those poor brethren [were] in the water nearly all day. We wanted to thank them, but they would not listen to [us]. My dear mother felt in her heart to bless them for their kindness. She said, 'God bless you for taking me over this water and in such an awful, rough way.' [They said], 'Oh, ... I don't want any of that. You are welcome. We have come to help you.' " This sister also reported that one of the rescuers "stayed so long in the water that he had to be taken out and packed to camp, and he was a long time before he recovered, as he was chilled through. And in after life he was always afflicted with rheumatism" (Patience Loader Rozsa Archer, reminiscence, in Women's Voices: An Untold History of the Latter-day Saints, 18301900, ed. Kenneth W. Godfrey, Audrey M. Godfrey, and Jill Mulvay Derr [1982], 236; spelling and punctuation standardized).

These rescuers and what they had done were brought to President Young's attention. "When President Brigham Young heard of this heroic act," one writer stated, "he wept like a child, and declared that this act alone would immortalize them" (Solomon F. Kimball, "Our Pioneer Boys," Improvement Era, July 1908, 679).
"Condemn me not because of mine imperfection,... but rather give thanks unto God that he hath made manifest unto you our imperfections, that ye may learn to be more wise than we have been." Mormon 9:31
shannonb
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by shannonb »

okay so i know Clark Allen Huntington is my great-great-(great-?) grandfather...something like that... Do you have information on his line? i didn't see much about his descendants but maybe i'm just not clear on how to use the site.
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Ian
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by Ian »

we aren't direct descendants of clark allen huntington, so we don't have information about his children. we descend from his grandfather, william huntington. we have information about clark allen huntington's paternal line, but not much about his maternal line.

our page for clark allen huntington is at this link:
http://huntingtonfamily.org/genealogy/g ... ohnandtuly

and here's the link to his pedigree chart:
http://huntingtonfamily.org/genealogy/p ... ohnandtuly
so let it be written... so let it be done.
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John
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by John »

Do we consider the "ancestry.com" resource that Mom referenced to be sufficiently reliable
to adjust our record's death date for C. Allen from the "Abt. 1900" to the more specific date listed there?
It is also different regarding place.
"Music's golden tongue flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor."
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Ian
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by Ian »

no, because we don't know where that information came from. much of our genealogical data are not yet verified by primary sources. my goal is to change that as much as we can. read this.
so let it be written... so let it be done.
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John
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by John »

Excellent!
I wonder if we might be able to continue to "collect" data and somehow more easily distinguish it from the adequately documented data.
As this article states, frequently the undocumented stuff can still offer valuable clues leading to documentation, yes?
"Music's golden tongue flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor."
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Ian
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Re: Clark Allen Huntington (1831-1896)

Post by Ian »

unverified data may sometimes provide "clues," but i think just as often, they can lead us down the wrong path. i think we should focus on finding verified data first... most of the "data" we have accumulated so far is not documented. we need to change that. if we don't do our research properly, then our work won't be much help for future generations.
so let it be written... so let it be done.
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